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Author: Subject: car jack lifting pad for car sill
Slimy38

posted on 12/4/20 at 09:04 AM Reply With Quote
car jack lifting pad for car sill

My current car has nothing underneath that I would call a 'jacking point', so I need to use the sill points. But I want to use a slotted jack pad to save collapsing the weld seam.

The proper pads aren't cheap, but it's a fairly basic design that I could cut out of a rubber block. Problem is, I don't know what type of rubber I'm looking for. The various Ebay versions do just say 'rubber'. Is there anything specific I could look for that would do the trick?

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macc man

posted on 12/4/20 at 09:21 AM Reply With Quote
I found a pair on ebay less than 7. They are made of a very hard rubber.
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ken555

posted on 12/4/20 at 09:28 AM Reply With Quote
Ice hockey puck and an angle grinder

They are about 1.50 each

[Edited on 12-4-20 by ken555]






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PorkChop

posted on 12/4/20 at 09:31 AM Reply With Quote
Hockey pucks.

Although, seriously, just buy one (or three if you wanted to use them on axle stands), they're cheap enough to avoid all the faff of cutting them.


[Edited on 12/4/20 by PorkChop]

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Slimy38

posted on 12/4/20 at 09:40 AM Reply With Quote
Hockey pucks were my first thought, but they're not deep enough. Can they be glued together?
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ken555

posted on 12/4/20 at 10:04 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Slimy38
Hockey pucks were my first thought, but they're not deep enough. Can they be glued together?


Tigerseal/PU adhesive would work, or countersunk bolts and nuts ?

the pressure is downwards so just something to hold it in place, I would think






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sdh2903

posted on 12/4/20 at 10:30 AM Reply With Quote
I'd just buy one. Not worth the fannying around. Smaller dimension ones are available cheaper.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/274304684126

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Slimy38

posted on 12/4/20 at 01:53 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sdh2903
I'd just buy one. Not worth the fannying around. Smaller dimension ones are available cheaper.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/274304684126


Not deep enough unfortunately, the weight would be back on the seam rather than on the sill. I've ordered half a dozen pucks from Amazon. I want to make up some that will fit on top of my axle stands too, although I've not yet figured out how to jack up the car and then put the axle stand in the same place!

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Mr Whippy

posted on 12/4/20 at 10:25 PM Reply With Quote
You should always be jacking onto wood packing. If jacking on the sill use a 1 inch thick piece at least a foot long. The teeth of the jack seat bite into the wood fixing it in place and the soft wood will prevent the sill being damaged while also spreading the load. If resting on stands its better to use just the stand (not the extension) so the tube also bites into the wood. This is my Fiesta resting on stands and this is the only setup I'm prepared to go under the car with, I've been spending days under there. The front is resting on the same setup under the front chassis rails.




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Slimy38

posted on 13/4/20 at 09:02 AM Reply With Quote
Interesting photos, thanks. I don't understand why you're on the actual seam though? I am fully in support of spreading the load, I like the idea of it being at least a foot long. But the jack points are actually each side of the seam, not the seam itself. Even the 'widow maker' spare wheel jack doesn't actually touch the seam, it fits on the metal either side.

I can't really disagree with the pictures, it looks like that seam is staying intact. It's just not something I will be doing.

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Mr Whippy

posted on 13/4/20 at 09:39 AM Reply With Quote
The sill is made from 3 sheets and the jacking point has extra metal there too, including the weld seam. If you looked at a cross section of the sill you'd understand. The seam itself is the reinforced part, not the sill area either side of it.

The fun starts when jacking up older cars where the jacking point is weak and the jack just disappears through the sill lol fortunately this car is fine.

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coyoteboy

posted on 13/4/20 at 01:01 PM Reply With Quote
Having jacked on a car with a sill jacking point and appropriate pad and folded the sill, I always look for a better spot. Jacking on the seam is a total no no for me unless you also contact the material either side to stabilise it - you just split the seam or fold it over and let water penetrate.

[Edited on 13/4/20 by coyoteboy]





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Mr Whippy

posted on 13/4/20 at 02:43 PM Reply With Quote
Well depends if there is an option, given a choice I will always jack on a hefty subframe or preferably one of the large bolts holding it on the car, again with a pad of wood cos metal on metal is super slippery.

However if there are no subframes or suspension on the car... I'll jack on the sill near the jacking point and spread the load. I've had to straighten plenty of sills in the past due to tyre shops jacking up on any convenient bit of body work. A good practice is to also put any removed wheels under the car, so that if it falls you have some space left.

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Slimy38

posted on 13/4/20 at 04:36 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy
Well depends if there is an option, given a choice I will always jack on a hefty subframe or preferably one of the large bolts holding it on the car, again with a pad of wood cos metal on metal is super slippery.

However if there are no subframes or suspension on the car... I'll jack on the sill near the jacking point and spread the load. I've had to straighten plenty of sills in the past due to tyre shops jacking up on any convenient bit of body work. A good practice is to also put any removed wheels under the car, so that if it falls you have some space left.


I agree, my preference is also some substantial bolt that is already load bearing or similar. The problem is the first thing I encountered when looking under the car was plastic panels across most of the car. I can't identify the normal contact points I'd have expected to be present. The sills are the only bare metal I could see.

The tyre shop fitting is an entirely different thing I've not yet figured out, so far the car has had it's tyres fitted at the dealer so I'd hope they know how to lift the car. While it might seem overkill I'm tempted to take my wheels in my wife's car, same as I would if I ever got my kit car finished.

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coyoteboy

posted on 17/4/20 at 02:59 PM Reply With Quote
I was quite interested to see that the jacking points on my Nissan are unusual - the front subframe (not that unusual) or the rear diff casing - nowhere else. The rest of the points (sills) are called out as lift points only for use when all 4 are used together or for safety stands.


https://www.350z-tech.com/attachments/jackpoints1-jpg.27421/


[Edited on 17/4/20 by coyoteboy]





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