Printable Version | Subscribe | Add to Favourites
New Topic New Poll New Reply
Author: Subject: How long does it take you to service your car?
speedyxjs

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:22 AM Reply With Quote
How long does it take you to service your car?

Im trying to work out a business plan and need a rough idea of how long it takes to service an average car but have never timed myself servicing my car.

[Edited on 25-6-09 by speedyxjs]





List your S/IVA failures here

Looking for a gearbox (auto or manual) for a ford 2.9 V6

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
DarrenW

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:26 AM Reply With Quote
Arent all of the car service times detailed in the Autodate books.

Actual time probs depends on level of service being undertaken. I had mine done at a local garage a while ago. Went in for basic oil service. However the guy sensibly suggested that since it is the first time he had seem the car he would like to strip down the brakes and check them over too. Yes it got more money out of me but he was still competitive and gave piece of mind.






View User's Profile E-Mail User View All Posts By User U2U Member This User Has MSN Messenger
MikeCapon

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:27 AM Reply With Quote
You need a bit more information than that. All the manufacturers quote 'book' times for servicing. Clearly this varies with the complexity of the service involved and the type of car. You need to find this out first. If you just want a rough ball park figure perhaps 2.5 to 4 hours for a major service on a a typical family car.

If you want specifics look here.

View User's Profile E-Mail User Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
Mr Whippy

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:27 AM Reply With Quote
covering what though?

brakes & engine & gearbox oil? or just the engine?






View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member   Mr+Whippy 's Aim   Mr+Whippy 's Yahoo
speedyxjs

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:31 AM Reply With Quote
I dont have autodata yet.
I am just after a rough figure for brakes, engine, gearbox and a general look over for the average car. Say 2.0 focus for example.

Mike - What cars have a service time of 2.5 - 4 hours?

[Edited on 25-6-09 by speedyxjs]





List your S/IVA failures here

Looking for a gearbox (auto or manual) for a ford 2.9 V6

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
iank

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:31 AM Reply With Quote
Rather depends on the car and the level of service.

Some cars are real pig's to work on, even for simple things like spark plug changes. On older cars getting things like brake disks off (if they need changing) can require serious brute force.

I'd say anything from 30mins (simple filters and oil change) up to 8hrs (only for the extreme case of the cam-belt needing a scheduled replacement on something where the engine needs to be removed to do the job).





--
Never argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level, then beat you with experience.
Anonymous

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
scottc

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:38 AM Reply With Quote
Took a smart in to get the Aircon regassed (under warranty) on Monday morning. Got it back 5pm yesterday.

Therefore servicing a car in Spain takes a very long time.





http://www.sotoconnect.com

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
MikeCapon

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:39 AM Reply With Quote
A while ago I worked for a national all make chain of garages. We used to book all major services for 2.5 hours. In reality a few took less time but most took longer.

This applies to pretty much any regular car but there are always going to be exceptions where you've got to take half the car apart to get at the plugs, rusted on parts, rounded nuts, snapped studs....

Are you sure you want to do this? It's great working on your own car but trying to get a neglected, rusty heap to run right is no fun believe me.

View User's Profile E-Mail User Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
speedyxjs

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:46 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MikeCapon
Are you sure you want to do this? It's great working on your own car but trying to get a neglected, rusty heap to run right is no fun believe me.


Im opening a garage when i have finished college next year and thought this would be a good way to gain a bit of experience





List your S/IVA failures here

Looking for a gearbox (auto or manual) for a ford 2.9 V6

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
DarrenW

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:46 AM Reply With Quote
I was talking to local garage operator recently. Std times and working out a fair cost is obviously good, but some garages seem to have a discussion in the background to charge a similar price for std work in a local area to keep trade fair between them all. Sounded strange to me in one way but i guess also stops (prevents?) the situation where one undercuts the rest and starts a trade war. I guess the other side to your business plan should be to see what the competition are advertising basic services at. Only problem with this is you dont know if they have a policy of selling additional work to customers that isnt advertised.






View User's Profile E-Mail User View All Posts By User U2U Member This User Has MSN Messenger
BenB

posted on 25/6/09 at 10:48 AM Reply With Quote
It depends on the car. Modern cars aren't really designed for ease of servicing. I can service my old Micra in about an hour.

To replace just the fuel filter on my diesel Megane takes hours because you have to take the bumper off....

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
speedyxjs

posted on 25/6/09 at 11:05 AM Reply With Quote
Thanks for the replys guys
I think il work on 4 hours per car to start with. That way i can get a rough idea and book more when i get more used to it





List your S/IVA failures here

Looking for a gearbox (auto or manual) for a ford 2.9 V6

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
pgtips

posted on 25/6/09 at 11:39 AM Reply With Quote
We charge 2.5 hours for a major service and 1.5 hours for an interim service. Thats on "normal" everyday cars. On anything exotic and 4 wheel drives we will ad another half an hour on top. Again all depends the vehicle and how much plastic rubbish we have to remove to get to the part we need to replace. Experience plays a part here too. On a dealership that they service the same vehicles everyday the job will get done quicker, but you will still get charged the same.
Good luck with your new venture. Don't forged that you will need at list two diagnostic tools to cover euro and asian vehicles for ECU reading as you SHOULD do at the end of every service. I can tell you now that they not comming cheap. You will also need them for turning the service lights out at the cars you will be servicing. We got two at the cost of 8000 but we do allot of diagnostcs the same time. Oh also you will need something like Autodata for your service scedules.......and they not coming cheap either........good luck.

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
Guinness

posted on 25/6/09 at 11:43 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by DarrenW
some garages seem to have a discussion in the background to charge a similar price for std work in a local area to keep trade fair between them all


No, Darren, you didn't have that conversation with them, at all. Ever.

That would be an illegal price fixing cartel. The sort of thing that the EU takes a very dim view on. Remember how much BA were fined for fixing prices with Virgin?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/6959725.stm



Mike






View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
Humbug

posted on 25/6/09 at 11:49 AM Reply With Quote
Times must be getting hard because the local Aston Martin + Jaguar dealer is advertising servicing on all makes "from 99"... at their likely rates, the service probably consists of making sure that the light goes on when you open the door

[Edited on 25.06.2009 by Humbug]

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
Mr Whippy

posted on 25/6/09 at 12:00 PM Reply With Quote
there's probably a better market for just offering simple services, like changing filters and oil, maybe brake servicing rather than more involved work like timing belts, clutches or fault finding as most garages do. That way you could turn around more cars and not have to splash out on expensive diagnostic equipment, plus you'd probably end up making a lot more money too.






View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member   Mr+Whippy 's Aim   Mr+Whippy 's Yahoo
craig1410

posted on 25/6/09 at 12:05 PM Reply With Quote
Hi,
I've just done the 40k mile service on my wife's SEAT Altea 1.6 petrol. I bought genuine parts from SEAT and did the work myself in an afternoon. THis included the full SEAT service schedule (as I have access to a copy of their service software) including:

Air Filter, Oil Filter, Cabin Filter, Oil Change, Spark Plug change, numerous checks and lubrication of door hinges. I also did a full valet of the car but that took most of the next day...

The spark plugs were a bit tricky to replace as they are hard to get to being in amongst the fuel injection rail and they were very very tight due to so rusting of the plugs. I definitely wouldn't recommend running a set of plugs for longer than 40k miles or they could be a real problem to extract! I had to use plusgas to release number 4 spark plug as it was so tight I was worried it was going to snap!

SEAT quoted me 250 to carry out this service which I think included about 3 hours of labour. I did it in about 4 hours and it cost me 80 for all genuine parts including the oil.

Older cars will probably give you more problems due to things seizing up (eg. spark plugs, sump plugs, undertray fixings etc) so watch out for that.

You should look at competitor rates including main dealer rates for services on different cars as this will give you a clue as to the time required. You may need to accept a lower profit level initially while you get up to speed and will make money on some cars and lose money on others. You can also offer added cost extras such as timing belt, water pump and brake fluid replacement. The brake fluid change is a good one as I was quoted 50 to have it done by SEAT whereas the fluid itself only cost me 6-odd and simply involves pushing 250ml of fluid through each bleed nipple. Easy money when the car is already up on the ramp...

Good luck!
Craig.

View User's Profile E-Mail User Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
wilkingj

posted on 25/6/09 at 12:29 PM Reply With Quote
Yup... Agree

I just had my brake flexi's changed. I suppplied the flexi pipes.
They had to cut off the old steel pipes (original factory ones) and had to make me 3 new cupronickel ones). They managed to round off the brass nuts on the pipes (yes Brass fittings on the pipes!)
It was a bastard to get at, as I had already tried, and it really needed a proper lift.

They charged 15 for a litre of brake fluid, and 40 for the 3 brake pipes they made.
now I know that 25ft of pipe costs less than 10, and a litre of fluid is similar or less.
Apart from the labour charge at 40 per hour, I thought the parts were exorbitant.
This is where the garages make their money.
It wasnt a really difficult job, it was straightforward but difficult to get at without the lift.

Still I couldnt have done it lying on my back and with a hernia to boot. It looks like the pipes and flexi's were the original Volvo factory fitments.

Still better safe than sorry where brakes are concerned.







1. The point of a journey is not to arrive.
2. Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

Best Regards
Geoff
http://www.v8viento.co.uk

View User's Profile E-Mail User Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
pgtips

posted on 25/6/09 at 12:29 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by craig1410
Hi,
I've just done the 40k mile service on my wife's SEAT Altea 1.6 petrol. I bought genuine parts from SEAT and did the work myself in an afternoon. THis included the full SEAT service schedule (as I have access to a copy of their service software) including:

Air Filter, Oil Filter, Cabin Filter, Oil Change, Spark Plug change, numerous checks and lubrication of door hinges. I also did a full valet of the car but that took most of the next day...

The spark plugs were a bit tricky to replace as they are hard to get to being in amongst the fuel injection rail and they were very very tight due to so rusting of the plugs. I definitely wouldn't recommend running a set of plugs for longer than 40k miles or they could be a real problem to extract! I had to use plusgas to release number 4 spark plug as it was so tight I was worried it was going to snap!

SEAT quoted me 250 to carry out this service which I think included about 3 hours of labour. I did it in about 4 hours and it cost me 80 for all genuine parts including the oil.

Older cars will probably give you more problems due to things seizing up (eg. spark plugs, sump plugs, undertray fixings etc) so watch out for that.

You should look at competitor rates including main dealer rates for services on different cars as this will give you a clue as to the time required. You may need to accept a lower profit level initially while you get up to speed and will make money on some cars and lose money on others. You can also offer added cost extras such as timing belt, water pump and brake fluid replacement. The brake fluid change is a good one as I was quoted 50 to have it done by SEAT whereas the fluid itself only cost me 6-odd and simply involves pushing 250ml of fluid through each bleed nipple. Easy money when the car is already up on the ramp...

Good luck!
Craig.


Yep Ref brake fluid...........if it was only that simple........some cars are easy to renew the fluid some cars only with diagnostic equipment............the joy of modern cars....

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
speedyxjs

posted on 25/6/09 at 12:31 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy
there's probably a better market for just offering simple services, like changing filters and oil, maybe brake servicing rather than more involved work like timing belts, clutches or fault finding as most garages do. That way you could turn around more cars and not have to splash out on expensive diagnostic equipment, plus you'd probably end up making a lot more money too.


Thats a good idea





List your S/IVA failures here

Looking for a gearbox (auto or manual) for a ford 2.9 V6

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
ReMan

posted on 25/6/09 at 01:22 PM Reply With Quote
"" The brake fluid change is a good one as I was quoted 50 to have it done by SEAT whereas the fluid itself only cost me 6-odd and simply involves pushing 250ml of fluid through each bleed nipple. Easy money when the car is already up on the ramp... ""

can you elaborate on this as I now have 2 cars past their brake fluid change , simply because I was'nt going to have the garage charge 90 for it on the last (needed the book stamped) service.

I can't say I believe it's particularly nessesary either, but if there's an easy way I might do it

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
pgtips

posted on 25/6/09 at 03:27 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
I can't say I believe it's particularly nessesary either




Brake fluid needs replacing every 2 years with out a doubt. After that it looses it's boiling point. i.e you go down on a steep hill, using your brakes more than normal, your old brake fluid overheats, boils,and you loose your brakes.
Simples.

[Edited on 25/6/09 by pgtips]

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
craig1410

posted on 25/6/09 at 03:28 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ReMan
"" The brake fluid change is a good one as I was quoted 50 to have it done by SEAT whereas the fluid itself only cost me 6-odd and simply involves pushing 250ml of fluid through each bleed nipple. Easy money when the car is already up on the ramp... ""

can you elaborate on this as I now have 2 cars past their brake fluid change , simply because I was'nt going to have the garage charge 90 for it on the last (needed the book stamped) service.

I can't say I believe it's particularly nessesary either, but if there's an easy way I might do it


Brake fluid is hygroscopic (absorbs water) so over time the water content will build up which will reduce the boiling point and increase risk of corrosion of wheel cylinders etc. I'd say for the price of the fluid it is well worth changing every 2 years.

On an older car without ABS, replacing brake fluid is dead easy as you just need to syphon out the old fluid from the reservoir (don't touch the pedal when doing this to avoid air getting in) and then top up with clean fluid. If you have a pressurised brake bleeder then attach this to the master cylinder to keep it topped up and avoid the need to pump the pedal. If you don't then you just need an assistant to press the pedal for you. Note that you shouldn't use too much pressure with a pressure bleeder (I'd tend to use about 1 bar / 14.5psi)

All you need to do now is go round the 4 corners (in bleed sequence - see workshop manual) and bleed off the prescribed amount. For my Altea it is 250ml per corner making 1 litre in total. Note that you must ensure that no air enters the bleed nipple. I usually use the short rubber tube with end immersed in clean fluid method to ensure this.

As someone said earlier in the thread, some cars require (or at least recommend) the use of diagnostic equipment to activate the various ABS components to assist with the bleeding process. However, while I agree that this may be required in order to expel air from the system, if you are simply replacing fluid I would question whether this is necessary.

The fluid replacement process without special equipment may not be perfect in that some pockets of old fluid may remain but it should replace the majority of fluid I would have thought, and over time the remaining old fluid will be absorbed into the new fluid and a net gain in fluid "health" will result.

I hope this helps,
Craig.

View User's Profile E-Mail User Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member

New Topic New Poll New Reply


go to top






Website design and SEO by Studio Montage

All content 2001-12 LocostBuilders. Reproduction prohibited
Opinions expressed in public posts are those of the author and do not necessarily represent
the views of other users or any member of the LocostBuilders team.
Running XMB 1.8 Partagium [ 2002 XMB Group] on Apache under CentOS Linux
Founded, built and operated by ChrisW.