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Author: Subject: ReViere airbox for Hayabusa?
Chet

posted on 11/11/09 at 02:02 AM Reply With Quote
ReViere airbox for Hayabusa?

I need an aftermarket airbox for an 08 Busa. I can modify an earlier model if necessary. Anyone have a ReViere airbox or similar for sale or trade?

Thanks
Chet

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Triggerhappy

posted on 11/11/09 at 10:01 AM Reply With Quote
Im in about the same situation,
The std air trumpets is quite long after some investigation (due to serious hight problem) it seams the shorter GSXR1000K7- trumpets work well and actually adds an or two hp in top range and are just 1/2" high...so i bought 4 of those...i had an look at Pipercross airbox: http://www.pipercross.net/competition/products_600_airbox.asp

As it looks now i will laminate my own solution from CF/Epoxi as i basically will have an 6-8litre airbox fed from an 102mm hose from the front...so i will keep an large volume air column fed from the car´s speed.





Im from Sweden, so im escused...The Muppet drummer for president!!

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coozer

posted on 11/11/09 at 04:10 PM Reply With Quote
Make one... whittle a lump of foam to the shape then cover in fibreglass matting and tissue and jobs a gudden...

Fingers crossed here





1972 V8 Jago

Midlana when I find the space...

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cosmick

posted on 11/11/09 at 08:49 PM Reply With Quote
Hayabusa Airbox

I have used the early type airbox with great success. The secret is to cut off the original intakes and blank off the bottom of the airbox where the air would normally be drawn in. Cut a 100mm hole in the middle of the air filter so that the air is now taken in through the top of the filter. The original airbox now fits neatly to the engine by turning the whole airbox around through 180 degrees. I have also been able to duct cold air straight into the airbox so providing a forced induction at speed. There is also the added bonus of NO air induction noise. The new airbox cannot be adapted in the same way as the air filter will not allow the same modification. Rescued attachment MEGABUSA 051.jpg
Rescued attachment MEGABUSA 051.jpg

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Chet

posted on 12/11/09 at 07:35 PM Reply With Quote
I've heard of people reversing the old air box but hadn't seen a pic until yours.

Can you tell me the height of the airbox above the TBs?

Thanks
Chet

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cosmick

posted on 12/11/09 at 10:46 PM Reply With Quote
as you may see, i have removed a small portion of the top of the airbox to fit under the hood of my Westfield. This is to make it so that nothing was removed from the hood to keep the hood intact. I will measure the height and come back to you later.
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Chet

posted on 13/11/09 at 12:41 AM Reply With Quote
Thanks for your help.

Chet

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cosmick

posted on 15/11/09 at 01:37 PM Reply With Quote
Hayabusa Airbox Measurements

From the throttle bodies to the top of the airbox measured in a vertical line is 4.5 inches. However, the area which will come into contact with the hood is through the moulding line of the airbox and on my car, I have cut off a small proportion to lower the overall height. this was around 4.5 inches before cutting and now is around 3.5 inches with the airbox tapered off. if you have an original airbox and you compare the results with my photo, you will see how little the capacity of the airbox has changed but at the same time, allowing clearance between the underside of the hood and the airbox.
My intention to fit this style of box was for many reasons. 1, to reduce air induction noise. 2, to return the engine to its designed filter. 3 to form part of the forced air intake. I have achieved all of these aspects. The forced air intake is formed in the bonnet/hood using the standard V8 hood supplied with the Megabusa, I made use of the power bulge to actually collect the air and drive it into the Hayabusa airbox. As your car is different, there may not be any point in showing you photos. The major breakthrough was to have the idea of where the air was actually taken in to the airbox. as you will see from the photo, the air now passes directly into the air filter from the other side to the stock airbox. This overcomes a lot of problems in one go. Firstly, the airbox will not fit reversed without cutting off the original intake funnells. Also the air would flow into the filter in an awkward way if you still fed it from the under side. Blocking off the original side and cutting a 100mm/4 inch hole in the air filter works brilliantly. This combined with the hood modification means that the air is colder than from under the hood and i know my acceleration has improved. Some people have been excluded from track days by drive by noise tests which is entirely due to induction noise not exhaust. I use my car on the road as well as track and when i first bought it, it had the Westfield/Pipercross filter. This was very noisy and lacked power in comparison and got on my nerves on long journeys.
I hope this information will help.

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Harrismagnum04

posted on 19/6/18 at 10:11 PM Reply With Quote
Great mod ! Can I ask how you repaired the box, did you plastic weld it ?
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