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Author: Subject: Fuel Pipes
rdodger

posted on 9/11/12 at 04:43 PM Reply With Quote
Fuel Pipes

I am at the point of running brake and fuel lines down the tunnel.

I have clips set down the tunnel just below the tunnel top on the drivers side to take the 2 fuel hardlines and the brake pipe.

I would be interested in any pics on how people have dealt with the pipes around the diff area. I want to keep them as neat as poss.

What have people used? I have some plastic ones but was considering aluminium? The plastic will be difficult to bend in a tight radius.

How long us it advisable to run the rubber pipe at the back? I was hoping to keep the rubber pipe length to a minimum.

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks

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mark chandler

posted on 9/11/12 at 05:15 PM Reply With Quote
Not sure about aluminium pipe, it will work harden and crack if you are not careful.

I used central heating micro bore copper from B&Q with soldered olives on the ends to stop the rubber tubing from slipping off.

Copper is easy to form around the diff.

Regards Mark

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pewe

posted on 9/11/12 at 06:06 PM Reply With Quote
IIRC any "rubber" fuel pipe needs to be Nitrile and marked "Unleaded" as lead free fuels cook anything else.
Just in case you are running a live axle be careful as to how much up and down movement there is on the prop shaft inside the tunnel - ask me how I know.
As above copper micro bore central heating pipe worked for me.
Clips came as samples from Moss Plastics.
HTH. Cheers, Pewe10

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renetom

posted on 9/11/12 at 06:11 PM Reply With Quote
pipes

Hi
The solution is as Mark suggested , that's exactly what we did
And by far the best way.
And rubber pipe protection any where the pipe might rub (IVA)
We ran ours on the bottom nearside of the tunnel, & the 2 brake pipes at the top
Save's going over the axle , runs on the chassis.
Good luck
Renι

[Edited on 9/11/12 by renetom]

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britishtrident

posted on 9/11/12 at 06:37 PM Reply With Quote
LPG kit suppliers will sell you a suitable length roll of plastic coated copper pipe in the popular 6mm and 8mm bores. Very similar to plastic coated brake pipe easy to work just peel off the plastic to put the olives on. They sell 6 meters more than enough to do a car for about £12 to £14

http://autogas-lpg.co.uk/24-pipes-hoses-lpg





[I] “ What use our work, Bennet, if we cannot care for those we love? .”
― From BBC TV/Amazon's Ripper Street.
[/I]

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rdodger

posted on 9/11/12 at 06:38 PM Reply With Quote
Thanks for the replies

It is a Sierra diff not live axle.

If using copper is this going to be ok with the new fuel we are going to end up with?

Would kunifer be a good option?

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macc man

posted on 9/11/12 at 08:40 PM Reply With Quote
I was under the impression that copper was not suitable for fuel pipe. Something to do with contamination with the petrol.
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Chippy

posted on 9/11/12 at 10:54 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by macc man
I was under the impression that copper was not suitable for fuel pipe. Something to do with contamination with the petrol.


Well another untrue fact I think, mine has been running with copper fuelpipe for over 6 years and more than 10,000 miles and certainly no faults to date. Cheers Ray





To make a car go faster, just add lightness. Colin Chapman - OR - fit a bigger engine. Chippy

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ElmrPhD

posted on 23/12/12 at 12:44 PM Reply With Quote
Just a little addition to muddy the waters: according to Carroll Smith (RIP, the author of multiple books we all should read), COPPER, not alumin(i)um is the metal to avoid as copper will work-harden and crack. Now, THAT should wake up a few of you as I think most of us are using copper for both brake and (high-pressure) fuel lines.

Keep in mind, this is all in the context of high-spec' racing - he's not at all concerned with street cars.

Carroll suggests Al, or steel for the larger diameters (think American V8 fuel supply) and strongly advises against the use of copper...
In fact, those BEC types looking to save every gram should prefer lighter Al, in any case.

No, this is not bait. (Do people even do that anymore?)

Steve, in the NLs

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britishtrident

posted on 23/12/12 at 01:29 PM Reply With Quote
Copper brake pipe is not adviseable - Kunifer (a Cupro - Nickle alloy with a trace amount of Iron in the mix) is the material of choice.

Usingthick wall copper Fuel pipe is less critical because the application is less susceptible to fatigue provided the pipe is properly supported and the connections to fixed units are made with flexible connections.





[I] “ What use our work, Bennet, if we cannot care for those we love? .”
― From BBC TV/Amazon's Ripper Street.
[/I]

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Oddified

posted on 23/12/12 at 02:42 PM Reply With Quote
Copper brake and fuel pipes on my car for about 15 years now, no problems what so ever

In fact the only vehicle i've had a brake pipe fail on was my van where the standard steel pipe had a pin hole corrode right through where it was fitted in a plastic clip to the chassis!

Ian

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britishtrident

posted on 23/12/12 at 03:06 PM Reply With Quote
Standard industrial grade copper pipe may meet industrial DIN and BS standards but it does not meet SAE standards for automotive brake systems.

In the USA in 1930's Zinc coated Steel Bundy pipe was invented because of a large number of failures of copper or brass pipe that was used in early hydraulic brake systems.

Kunifer pipe was developed in Scandinavia the 1960s for automotive use to combine the corrosion resistance of copper with greater fatigue resistance and strength.





[I] “ What use our work, Bennet, if we cannot care for those we love? .”
― From BBC TV/Amazon's Ripper Street.
[/I]

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sebastiaan

posted on 23/12/12 at 05:17 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by britishtrident
LPG kit suppliers will sell you a suitable length roll of plastic coated copper pipe in the popular 6mm and 8mm bores. Very similar to plastic coated brake pipe easy to work just peel off the plastic to put the olives on. They sell 6 meters more than enough to do a car for about £12 to £14

http://autogas-lpg.co.uk/24-pipes-hoses-lpg


This ^^^^ is a top tip. This stuff has been used for many, many years in the LPG industry and in the years I have been involved with that industry, I have never, ever heard of a copper fuel line failing due to work hardening, etc. This stuff has been certified to 70 bar burst pressure. In practice, the burst pressure is over 200 bars....

Cheap, simple to use, safe, proven in practice.... What more do you need?

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