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Author: Subject: Aluminium fuel tank without welding
Slimy38

posted on 2/4/18 at 03:15 PM Reply With Quote
Aluminium fuel tank without welding

I have a feeling I know the answer to this before I've asked it, but is it possible to make an aluminium fuel tank without welding? I'm thinking of folds to form most of the edges, but then some sort of physical and chemical join for the other seams. Basically rivets and a petrol resistant adhesive?

My initial plan was to weld up a steel tank, or even to follow the locost method and find a suitable tank from a donor. But if I can make it in aluminium I can save the headache of corrosion.

Or are there other ways of holding fuel? Has anyone tried a plastic tank?

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bonzoronnie

posted on 2/4/18 at 03:41 PM Reply With Quote
It is possible to fabricate a riveted alloy fuel tank.

After all, they have been used in the aviation industry for years.

You would need to research the correct sealers & rivets to use.

I am sure you'll find some good articles on the tinter web.

Not sure how you will stand on IVA testing though.

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mistergrumpy

posted on 2/4/18 at 03:58 PM Reply With Quote
I'm pretty sure I read a long time ago that plastic tanks were not allowed due to the risk of them splitting.
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adithorp

posted on 2/4/18 at 04:00 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mistergrumpy
I'm pretty sure I read a long time ago that plastic tanks were not allowed due to the risk of them splitting.


Plastic tanks are permitted for IVA but they must be certified.





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mistergrumpy

posted on 2/4/18 at 05:50 PM Reply With Quote
Ah. I stand corrected.
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jacko

posted on 2/4/18 at 06:27 PM Reply With Quote
you may not like this but to save a lot of hassle buy a tank
jacko

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Hopley89

posted on 2/4/18 at 06:56 PM Reply With Quote
Why donít you want a aluminium tank welded? surely it would be easier to make than
the sealant and rivets version? what would you do about outlet? and filler neck? as i
canít see how you would river and seal them?

ATB
HOP

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Slimy38

posted on 2/4/18 at 08:16 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hopley89
Why donít you want a aluminium tank welded? surely it would be easier to make than
the sealant and rivets version? what would you do about outlet? and filler neck? as i
canít see how you would river and seal them?

ATB
HOP


It's mainly because I have the capability to weld steel, but aluminium would have to be done by someone else. I went into this with 'locost' firmly in mind.

However, it would seem that even aluminium rivetted tanks are then sealed internally, a fairly easy process but quite a costly product. So I'm back to hicost.

I'm going to take a visit to the scrapyard to see if there's anything usable, if not it'll be a steel one. Thanks everyone.

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02GF74

posted on 2/4/18 at 08:53 PM Reply With Quote
When you say that you can weld steel, you mean mild steel, and using a MIG?

So how different is that to MIG welding stainless steel, corrosion solved.





Visit China. Meet the child that made your trainers.


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Hopley89

posted on 2/4/18 at 09:09 PM Reply With Quote
iím not far from you and i have a tig welder your welcome to come and use to make your tank?
i you want to save some money.

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907

posted on 2/4/18 at 09:26 PM Reply With Quote
What is wrong with a steel tank? Millions of cars have them. It will last as long as a steel chassis.


It strikes me that you have three choices.

1. Make a steel one.

2. Pay someone to make a stainless or ally one.

3. Buy a TIG. Learn to use it. Make your own tank. (By far the most costly solution)


Paul G

p.s.
Number 3 gives the most satisfaction.





Member of the Suttol Owners Club, the MX5 Owners Club and the BMMC

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Hopley89

posted on 2/4/18 at 09:49 PM Reply With Quote
Option 4. use my tig for free and make one (cheapest option)

But i would take option 3 because you can make anything else you need to
make once you have brought a tig welder




quote]Originally posted by 907
What is wrong with a steel tank? Millions of cars have them. It will last as long as a steel chassis.


It strikes me that you have three choices.

1. Make a steel one.

2. Pay someone to make a stainless or ally one.

3. Buy a TIG. Learn to use it. Make your own tank. (By far the most costly solution)


Paul G

p.s.
Number 3 gives the most satisfaction.

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Ian2812

posted on 2/4/18 at 10:02 PM Reply With Quote
Time is money.

http://www.kitcardirect.co.uk/4-5-gallon-alloy-kit-car-fuel-tank.html

Worth £168 all day long... Could have bought it and installed it by the time you've weighed up all your options.

I do also agree that buying a 'TIG' and making items yourself would be the most satisfying, however if 'locost' is your thing a decent TIG can be expensive, although saying that, you can get cheaper 'lidl special' types...

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Hopley89

posted on 2/4/18 at 10:07 PM Reply With Quote
i do agree with you, easier to buy one if you donít have the option to buy a tig welder,

but like i said he can use mine for free and just buy the material or buy one done!?

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gttztt

posted on 2/4/18 at 10:24 PM Reply With Quote
For alloy tank joint sealing use PPG PR1422 A1/2 or A2 sealants. This is the stickiest sticky stuff you will ever find. It comes in various viscosities but the brushable one is called PR142 A1/2 or PR1422 A2. The numbers refer to the working time - 1/2 hour or 2 hours. It will seal anything to anything and is the most vile thing in creation. It is used to seal aircraft integral fuel tanks.
It will get everywhere and you will never get it out of clothing. It is also resistant to pretty much everything so once it is on it stays on and is also a pig to remove once it has cured.
Apply wet to your joints and assemble. Brush the joints inside and out and clean up quick.

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dmrider_10

posted on 3/4/18 at 06:53 AM Reply With Quote
Can also vouch for "PRC" as its known in aircraft industry ^. It will literally stick anything to anything and seal against fuel no problem.
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907

posted on 3/4/18 at 07:35 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hopley89
Option 4. use my tig for free and make one (cheapest option)

But i would take option 3 because you can make anything else you need to
make once you have brought a tig welder




quote]Originally posted by 907
What is wrong with a steel tank? Millions of cars have them. It will last as long as a steel chassis.


It strikes me that you have three choices.

1. Make a steel one.

2. Pay someone to make a stainless or ally one.

3. Buy a TIG. Learn to use it. Make your own tank. (By far the most costly solution)


Paul G

p.s.
Number 3 gives the most satisfaction.







I didn't include an option 4 as I assumed that if the OP doesn't have a TIG then he would also need to become proficient at using it
before attempting to weld a fuel tank.

Also my experience of lending tools came to a head when a bloke down the road borrowed my torque wrench and when he finished he
unscrewed it way past zero until all the internal springs made a bid for freedom. Brought what was left back to me and walked away.
That little episode cost me £120 for a new one. Didn't even offer me a (what are they called on forums?) beer token.

Paul G





Member of the Suttol Owners Club, the MX5 Owners Club and the BMMC

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nick205

posted on 3/4/18 at 08:13 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jacko
you may not like this but to save a lot of hassle buy a tank
jacko



That's what I did for my MK Indy - bought a fabricated (welded) alloy one from MK. IIRC it wasn't that expensive and being made for the Indy it fitted perfectly so very little time and effort to install it.

Sourcing sheet alloy and getting it cut and folded could be a headache and probably not cheap either. If it leaks once tou've sealed and rivetted it then you've got another headache to overcome.

Don't get me wrong, I'm all for the make it yourself locost approach, but sometimes there are just quicker and more effective ways of doing things IMHO.

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Slimy38

posted on 3/4/18 at 01:48 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hopley89
iím not far from you and i have a tig welder your welcome to come and use to make your tank?
i you want to save some money.


Many thanks for the offer, but unfortunately I wouldn't trust myself with someone else's TIG. Even if they were stood behind me helping! It took me an entire college course to learn MIG

quote:
Originally posted by 907
What is wrong with a steel tank? Millions of cars have them. It will last as long as a steel chassis.


Nothing wrong with a steel one, I was just wondering whether an aluminium one could be made with the resources that I have.

quote:
Originally posted by 02GF74
When you say that you can weld steel, you mean mild steel, and using a MIG?

So how different is that to MIG welding stainless steel, corrosion solved.


Not a bad idea. I don't like welding stainless but I have the stuff for MIGging it. That might be the compromise that I'm looking for, thanks.

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