Printable Version | Subscribe | Add to Favourites
New Topic New Poll New Reply
Author: Subject: More Binky! (well, sort-of)
David Jenkins

posted on 19/11/18 at 08:38 PM Reply With Quote
More Binky! (well, sort-of)

Not a normal episode - and, as far as I'm concerned, a severe case of lathe abuse! I appreciate their skills in many things, but their machining speeds were all wrong...







The older I get, the better I was...

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
HowardB

posted on 20/11/18 at 02:50 PM Reply With Quote
a bit of behind the scenes is always good - amazing what can be achieved with a ML7!





Howard

Fisher Fury was 2000 Zetec - now a 1600 (it Lives again and goes zoom)

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
MikeRJ

posted on 20/11/18 at 09:02 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David Jenkins
I appreciate their skills in many things, but their machining speeds were all wrong...



If enough speed is good, more is better and too much is perfect!

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
JC

posted on 20/11/18 at 09:33 PM Reply With Quote
I know nothing about lathing but have always wanted to have a go so found it really interesting.

I presume the squeals of protest where because the lathe was too fast from the comments above!!!

View User's Profile E-Mail User Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
Nickp

posted on 21/11/18 at 06:46 AM Reply With Quote
It's not often you can accuse them of rushing things
View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
liam.mccaffrey

posted on 21/11/18 at 08:18 AM Reply With Quote
I haven't watched the video fully yet but I don't think that is a standard ML7 electric motor. It looks much bigger than mine and they are giving it a hot supper allright.

I have an ML7 and its so useful but with its relatively low top speed (600 ripems) and lack of power I have found that I can't get right surface speeds for Carbide insert tools especially. The chip load is just too high for the little thing. Taking tiny little cuts things take soooooooooooo long to do. I've been spoilt having used lathes in the past though.





Build Blog
Build Photo Album

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member This User Has MSN Messenger
rusty nuts

posted on 21/11/18 at 08:21 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by JC
I know nothing about lathing but have always wanted to have a go so found it really interesting.

I presume the squeals of protest where because the lathe was too fast from the comments above!!!




I suspect there maybe other causes of squeals such as tip hieght , angle , type etc . I tend to get it wrong fairly often

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
nick205

posted on 21/11/18 at 09:25 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by JC
I know nothing about lathing but have always wanted to have a go so found it really interesting.

I presume the squeals of protest where because the lathe was too fast from the comments above!!!




I worked in a machine shop 25 years ago and used mills and lathes. No formal training, just what fellow employees passed on to me and a bit of trial and error. I'd love to have a lathe (and mill) myself now, but space just doesn't permit unfortunately. I'm sure there's a lot of learning to be done regarding work piece materials, tool types, travel speeds, setups and so on. I'm also sure I'd learn most of it through trial and error as well.

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member
mcerd1

posted on 21/11/18 at 04:29 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by liam.mccaffrey
I have an ML7 and its so useful but with its relatively low top speed (600 ripems) and lack of power I have found that I can't get right surface speeds for Carbide insert tools especially. The chip load is just too high for the little thing. Taking tiny little cuts things take soooooooooooo long to do. I've been spoilt having used lathes in the past though.


I did think it was working very hard for an ML7

I've occasionally messed up and let the fire out of the metal with carbide tools my Hemberg, but its a much more solid old machine that can get to 2200rpm...





- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
SteveWalker

posted on 21/11/18 at 04:55 PM Reply With Quote
I prefer the Raglan LittleJohn MK2 to the ML7. Continuously mechanically variable speed between 50 and a little over 2000 rpm and can be varied without stopping to change pullies.
View User's Profile View All Posts By User U2U Member
David Jenkins

posted on 28/11/18 at 12:23 PM Reply With Quote
And now - part 2!







The older I get, the better I was...

View User's Profile Visit User's Homepage View All Posts By User U2U Member

New Topic New Poll New Reply


go to top






Website design and SEO by Studio Montage

All content 2001-16 LocostBuilders. Reproduction prohibited
Opinions expressed in public posts are those of the author and do not necessarily represent
the views of other users or any member of the LocostBuilders team.
Running XMB 1.8 Partagium [ 2002 XMB Group] on Apache under CentOS Linux
Founded, built and operated by ChrisW.