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Author: Subject: Engine position
Eddie1978

posted on 7/1/19 at 11:57 AM Reply With Quote
Engine position

Hi my question is a bit of "how long is a piece of string"

I am in the middle of rebuilding my 7esque car (really need to pull my finger out and update thread) I am currently working on the rear but I am always thinking about the whole car its becoming a bit of a obsession,


The car is based on a locost as in wheel track and base but I think the engine/box (xflow) are sitting quite far back in the chassis, there is a lot of dead space from the front of the block to front of the chassis (I could easily fit the radiator in the space) unfortunately never had the chance to drive the car so know idea how balanced it feels,

The easy option is to leave well alone after all its been like that for 21yrs and 10k miles. But if the engine is moved forward it means the bellhousing is not taking up as much space in the cockpit allowing abit more room for pedals. currently the pedal space is very tight (I have to be selective about what shoes to wear lol)

It will probs take a couple of days to move the engine forward and adjust the trans tunnel and will have to get a longer prop made up


has anybody got any measurements for the postion of the engine (xflow with t9) relative to the axles, and what sort of balance are the cars.

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Slater

posted on 7/1/19 at 01:04 PM Reply With Quote
Moving it forward will increase the polar moment of inertia.

Try this:

Put a slab of beer in your supermarket trolley at the bottom midway between the front and back wheels, then go up and down a few isles, see how it handles. Then move the slab right to the front, feel the difference in handling when you go round a corner.

I have to explain this every week to my wife when she dumps the heavy stuff in the wrong place in the trolley at Tesco.




Keep engine as far back as possible.

[Edited on 7-1-19 by Slater]





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nick205

posted on 7/1/19 at 03:50 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Slater
Moving it forward will increase the polar moment of inertia.

Try this:

Put a slab of beer in your supermarket trolley at the bottom midway between the front and back wheels, then go up and down a few isles, see how it handles. Then move the slab right to the front, feel the difference in handling when you go round a corner.

I have to explain this every week to my wife when she dumps the heavy stuff in the wrong place in the trolley at Tesco.




Keep engine as far back as possible.

[Edited on 7-1-19 by Slater]




A useful explanation and the precise reason I've stopped going on supermarket trips

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jps

posted on 7/1/19 at 05:32 PM Reply With Quote
Can't help - but i'm interested in others comments. I have just mounted my engine in my chassis and it's further back than most people fit theirs, the chassis was built to take the MT75 'box but I have a 4speed type3. As you say, there is a LOT of space at the front. I had just assumed that getting it nearer the centre of the car was more desireable for weight distribution...
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Eddie1978

posted on 7/1/19 at 06:21 PM Reply With Quote
I understand a 50/50 weight is best. But my engine and trans are a long long way back and even just moving it forward 2 inches will get me quite a bit more pedal space as I can adjust the trans tunnel
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SPYDER

posted on 7/1/19 at 08:45 PM Reply With Quote
The engine in my car is way further back than most, I guess by about seven inches or so. The designers made it that way. (Spyder Cars)
It also has the fuel tanks, two of them, in front of the rear axle line. So they seem very keen on getting weight as near to the middle as possible.

Having said that most Caterhams have their engine sticking under the nosecone and the fuel tank right at the back.

@OP... if I were you I would leave the engine where it is.

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02GF74

posted on 7/1/19 at 10:02 PM Reply With Quote
Engine is positioned well, find some thing else to work on.

I have driving boots as normal shoes won't fit, kept in the boot (where else!), suggest you do the same, it is slightly annoying to change shoes to get in or out but something I can put up with.






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Angel Acevedo

posted on 8/1/19 at 04:42 AM Reply With Quote
Why don´t you shorten the excess chassis??
That won´t do anything about your footwell area problem, but will add lightnes...
Won´t be an easy job though...





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907

posted on 8/1/19 at 06:40 AM Reply With Quote
Having the engine well back will enable equal weight on all four wheels.

The last thing you want is a tail happy seven.


Paul G






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snapper

posted on 9/1/19 at 07:59 AM Reply With Quote
All that said 50mm won’t make much if any noticeable difference.
I had to move my engine forward when I fitted a V6 Type 9 with bellhousing spacer, that was about 40mm





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