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Author: Subject: Broken stud made worse
speedyxjs

posted on 22/5/09 at 07:27 PM Reply With Quote
Broken stud made worse

Been trying to get a broken exhaust manifold stud out for the past week but despite breaking a mid size stud extractor and then drilling all the way through, filling up with penitrating oil and blocking the hole to let it soak, it still wouldnt budge

Bastard stud 1
Bastard stud 1


Screwed the biggest stud extractor in i had and (stupidly) used a 500mm bar to gain leverage.

Broken Stud Extractor
Broken Stud Extractor


Then my dad came along and said to drill to the side of it, which i did. He then decided to use a screwdriver and a chisel to try to split the stud.

Bastard stud 2
Bastard stud 2


The only option i can think of bar a new engine is to bolt the manifold on, drill a new hole and try to get it centered so that i can tap it to accept a bolt.





How long can i resist the temptation to drop a V8 in?

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r1_pete

posted on 22/5/09 at 07:35 PM Reply With Quote
Spark erosion would do it, but that would mean taking it to a machine shop, unless you can find a mobile operative.






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austin man

posted on 22/5/09 at 07:36 PM Reply With Quote
I broke a head bolt stud in my Austin Block some years ago, a local ngineer drilled it out and retapped it, I had the same problem extractor broke in it . The engineer sharpened a masonary bit and used that to drill it out. (apparently there is a special way to sharpen the tip) get one of these sharpened and use the bolting the manifold method on to ensure alignment you could use then retap





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locogeoff

posted on 22/5/09 at 07:56 PM Reply With Quote
Feel for you mate!

I've just sheared the cambelt idler bearing post off on my Ducati, been trying to build up the stud with weld which was succesful but that sheared when I got the bolt welded on to it, could you weld onto the stud extractor to at least get that out?

I'll be having another go this weekend at getting a better weld on then heating up the barrel a bit then using some wart spray to try and cool the stud down quickly and then give it another go.

Regards

Geoff



[Edited on 22/5/09 by locogeoff]

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rusty nuts

posted on 22/5/09 at 07:58 PM Reply With Quote
How many times has it been said on this forum that the best place for "Easiouts" is in the bin??? Your best bet would have been to drill it out and retap from the start.
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britishtrident

posted on 22/5/09 at 07:58 PM Reply With Quote
Eeziouts are trouble I would never go near any broken stud with one.

When broken stud is to short for a stud extractor first option is to drill but you can't drill out a broken eeziout.


If even a a tiny bit of Ezziout is stuck in the stud the only option open is spark erosion





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BenB

posted on 22/5/09 at 07:59 PM Reply With Quote
Easy-outs are the work of the devil. They snap really easily and are a bugger to drill out. But you can do it with patience and a ready supply of drill bits. It would have been better to drill down the middle of it with slowly bigger bits until you could "fold" the thin tube of stud into itself and pull it out. That's what I did when I sheared the head of a bolt off in my 'tina calipers. Of course first I drilled a little hold and broke and easy-out off in it just for good measure so had to drill that out too.... Not sure what your options are now you've drilled to the side of it other than going for something like a helicoil...
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speedyxjs

posted on 22/5/09 at 08:02 PM Reply With Quote
When we stripped the head down, we used one on a camshaft bolt and it worked really well but next time i will definately just use progressively bigger drill bits.





How long can i resist the temptation to drop a V8 in?

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pgtips

posted on 22/5/09 at 08:07 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rusty nuts
How many times has it been said on this forum that the best place for "Easiouts" is in the bin??? Your best bet would have been to drill it out and retap from the start.


Not true. I been using the Snap On easy outs for many years and I haven't managed to brake one yet even on the most badly seized studs. Not cheap but you get what you pay for. Those 2 pence ones from your local market are only good for getting you in to trouble.

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speedyxjs

posted on 22/5/09 at 08:13 PM Reply With Quote
The ones i used were my grandads





How long can i resist the temptation to drop a V8 in?

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pgtips

posted on 22/5/09 at 08:16 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by speedyxjs
The ones i used were my grandads


Naff said.....

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speedyxjs

posted on 22/5/09 at 08:18 PM Reply With Quote


ETA - your avatar is rather hypnotic

[Edited on 22-5-09 by speedyxjs]





How long can i resist the temptation to drop a V8 in?

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Howlor

posted on 22/5/09 at 08:25 PM Reply With Quote
How about you put an M8 or M10 nut over the broken area. Then try carefully welding on high power the top of the broken stud to the nut until the nut is full of weld. Then while hot try a spanner on it.

Steve

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Wheels244

posted on 22/5/09 at 08:31 PM Reply With Quote
^^^^^^^^^^^^^

What Steve said.

The heat from the weld will also help free the broken stud.

This will work if done right.

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mark chandler

posted on 22/5/09 at 08:35 PM Reply With Quote
Keep nibbling at it until the bits are all out, small drill down the side etc, it does not matter if central or at an angle.

Now drill and tap the hole for a much larger bolt, wind this in with super glue or similar on the threads.

Grind flush.

Bolt on manifold and drill and tap a new hole of the correct size in the right place, job done.

There is lots of meat in a jag head.

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Coose

posted on 22/5/09 at 08:40 PM Reply With Quote
Easier still and less destructive, buy a cheap Dremel type drill and some 3mm tungsten carbide tips and gently grind away the old stud. You may snap a few tips but buy plenty. Once out you may need to helicoil the hole as you'll probably cut into the old threads but it's no bad thing.





Spin 'er off Well...

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ashg

posted on 22/5/09 at 09:51 PM Reply With Quote
drill it out and tap it bigger. then fit a helicoil to bring the thread back down to the correct thread.





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paulf

posted on 22/5/09 at 10:04 PM Reply With Quote
When i worked for a general engineering company we often used to get local garages and fast fit centres bringing heads in for broken studs to be removed.A lot of times they had broken easy outs in them which they just happened to forget to tell us about.
Quite often we would have to damage the casting to remove them and then rebuild it with weld , sometimes we managed to drill them using resharpened masonry drills.
Paul.
quote:
Originally posted by pgtips
quote:
Originally posted by rusty nuts
How many times has it been said on this forum that the best place for "Easiouts" is in the bin??? Your best bet would have been to drill it out and retap from the start.


Not true. I been using the Snap On easy outs for many years and I haven't managed to brake one yet even on the most badly seized studs. Not cheap but you get what you pay for. Those 2 pence ones from your local market are only good for getting you in to trouble.

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Avoneer

posted on 22/5/09 at 10:24 PM Reply With Quote
Weld a nut onto it (weld on the inside of the nut).

Undo with spanner.

Easy peasy.

Pat...





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NigeEss

posted on 23/5/09 at 07:23 AM Reply With Quote
I'm with the weld a nut option and if that fails a good quality carbide burr and a Dremmel.





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britishtrident

posted on 23/5/09 at 07:37 AM Reply With Quote
Main problem with Eeziouts is the whole principle they work on -- if they do get a sdould grip they expand the broken stud in the hole (same action a Rawlplug) causing the stud to get an even better grip on the threads it is seized into.

Best 1st attack method is try and get the broken stud to turn with a sharp tool (masonary drill or old tap)

If that dosent work accurately drill a 1/8" or 3mm pilot hole in the centre of the stud then dril at 0.5mm below the tapping size for the thread -- the remains of the stud might come out easily or you can just re-tap.

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Peteff

posted on 23/5/09 at 10:53 AM Reply With Quote
Just weld it up and grind it flat then drill and tap it just off centre and oval the hole in your manifold. Put a washer behind the nut and no one will know the difference.





yours, Pete

I went into the RSPCA office the other day. It was so small you could hardly swing a cat in there.

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rusty nuts

posted on 23/5/09 at 12:17 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by pgtips
quote:
Originally posted by rusty nuts
How many times has it been said on this forum that the best place for "Easiouts" is in the bin??? Your best bet would have been to drill it out and retap from the start.


Not true. I been using the Snap On easy outs for many years and I haven't managed to brake one yet even on the most badly seized studs. Not cheap but you get what you pay for. Those 2 pence ones from your local market are only good for getting you in to trouble.


The "Snap On " ones are made by Ridgid tools IIFC and are a different design to Easi outs but you get what you pay for. I have a set of the Ridgid tools and still rarely use them

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