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Author: Subject: A new oil catch tank
David Jenkins

posted on 21/7/21 at 06:24 PM Reply With Quote
A new oil catch tank

I've just refitted my bike carbs (again!) and I'd decided that my original oil catch tank was useless - the oily vapour went straight through, fouled up the vent filter and left a mess inside the engine bay.

I had a good look on eBay, but nothing there did exactly what I wanted; some were close, but many would have been difficult to fit in the limited space available. In the end I decided to make my own - which is why I was asking all sorts of questions about plug welds, sorting problems with my welder, and so on.

I started off with a heap of bits and pieces, many of which came off my shelves.
materials
materials


The tube was checked for squareness, the edges were tidied up, and a baffle was shaped and drilled. This baffle was plug-welded inside the tube, and was intended to force the vapour downwards.
baffle plate
baffle plate

finished baffle
finished baffle

test fit
test fit


A bronze bush was silver-soldered near the top of the tube, for the inlet.
inlet bush
inlet bush


Then two bushes added for the oil sight glass, scrounged off another (inferior) oil catch tank.
sight glass bushes
sight glass bushes


The inlet pipe (bought off eBay) was soft-soldered into its bush.
inlet tube fitted
inlet tube fitted


Then the end plates were shaped up on the lathe, out of a piece of 10mm aluminium sheet I had on my shelf. Appropriate holes were drilled, and a 1/4" BSPT thread put into the base plate, for a drain tap.
end plate machining
end plate machining

end plate blanks
end plate blanks

end plate drilling
end plate drilling

completed end plates
completed end plates


The end plates are held on with a M6 threaded rod and fancy nuts, with a generous amount of silicone RTV sealant everywhere. Lots of stainless steel pan scourers were stuffed in before the caps were fitted for the final time. A 1/2" tube was fixed into the top plate with Loctite, fixing screws added, a spacer was made on my 3D printer, and a bracket made to mount the tank to some pre-existing holes in the chassis.
tank and bracket
tank and bracket


Finally, the whole thing was installed and connected to the crankcase vent with 1/2" bore pipe. Space is tight, but I can get to everything - with a stretch.
finished tank 1
finished tank 1

finished tank 2
finished tank 2


I don't yet know if it will work as planned - the end caps may leak, despite the tight fit and sealant, and the plastic spacer may prove to be too weak for the job. However, I now have the basic components and any problems that pop up should be easily fixable (hopefully!).





The older I get, the better I was...

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Slater

posted on 22/7/21 at 07:34 AM Reply With Quote
Nice work! That looks like a great Locost solution.





Why do they call Port Harcourt "The Garden City"?...... Becauase they can't spell Stramash.

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