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Author: Subject: Taps...
David Jenkins

posted on 4/2/24 at 04:12 PM Reply With Quote
Taps...

I'm feeling vaguely cross & frustrated...

Our kitchen taps are reasonably modern (maybe 5 or 6 years old) and they're starting to drip. I deliberately chose "old tech" taps with rubber washers as the water in my district eats the brass around ceramic tap valves (they usually give up after 2 or 3 years). I know that all I need to do is to replace the washers, possibly clean up the rim where the washers seat (I have the tool) and reassemble to fix the problem... except I can't get the brass tap valve bodies to unscrew from the chromed body. Nothing will shift them, and I've got to the point where, if I push any harder, I'm going to break something. They are absolutely solid, even though there's no sign off corrosion.

First dumb question - do kitchen tap valves use a conventional thread, or are they a reverse thread?

Otherwise - can anyone suggest a way of getting these damn things undone? I thought of applying some heat, but I expect that there are o-rings in there.

I'm receiving earache from SWMBO about these taps, so any guidance would be appreciated! I really don't want to pay good money to a real plumber if I can possibly avoid it, as it should be a trivial job.

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nick205

posted on 4/2/24 at 05:04 PM Reply With Quote
Sympathetic, but not solution I'm afraid.

Had to replace ceramic valves on my dripping kitchen tap and damn they're tight.
I'm wondering if plumbers have a particular tool (impact gun?) for the the.

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gremlin1234

posted on 4/2/24 at 08:52 PM Reply With Quote
it is common for taps to have counter threads for various parts.
but in any case, one of the usual methods of releasing a stuck thread is to try to tighten it, just to break the bond.
I recently had an issue with a 75yearold fitting, where calcium deposits had built up, making it difficult to operate. dismantled, using some force. cleaned up, cleaned up more on a polishing wheel, and reassembled with suitable lubrication, almost like new.

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Slimy38

posted on 4/2/24 at 09:09 PM Reply With Quote
Last time I removed a brass valve from a chrome tap I used a breaker bar. I was more worried about rounding things off than anything snapping. It moved eventually.

I reckon they were close to caliper carrier bolts level of tightness.





555

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Mr Whippy

posted on 5/2/24 at 07:53 AM Reply With Quote
Hand SWMBO the spanner tell her to fix it herself.





Fame is when your old car is plastered all over the internet

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jps

posted on 5/2/24 at 08:16 AM Reply With Quote
Heat wise, maybe try pouring a kettle of boiling water over them? Might do enough just to help it move?





Learning. Always learning...

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nick205

posted on 5/2/24 at 08:25 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy
Hand SWMBO the spanner tell her to fix it herself.





Mr Whippy - you sound like you may have encountered similar issues



When I've referred the job to SWMBO I start getting all manner of tool, thread and part questions!

Then then job comes back at me at SWMBO seems even more hacked off than she was to start with.

(especially when I've advised "you need a hammer"......"NO, NOT THAT HAMMER!"

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nick205

posted on 5/2/24 at 08:27 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jps
Heat wise, maybe try pouring a kettle of boiling water over them? Might do enough just to help it move?



Sounds good advice!

I considered heat, but ruled out my blow torch for fear of knackering the chrome finish and having to replace the tap.

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jacko

posted on 5/2/24 at 05:29 PM Reply With Quote
Wife may not be to far off rap rags round tap then try tapping with a hammer
Dont blame me if you damage anything





555

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Slimy38

posted on 6/2/24 at 10:11 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by nick205
quote:
Originally posted by jps
Heat wise, maybe try pouring a kettle of boiling water over them? Might do enough just to help it move?



Sounds good advice!

I considered heat, but ruled out my blow torch for fear of knackering the chrome finish and having to replace the tap.


I was wondering whether heat was a good idea at all, given that you have brass on the inside and steel on the outside? Wouldn't the brass expand more than steel? I'd expect a freeze spray or similar to be more effective to separate the parts.





555

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russbost

posted on 6/2/24 at 11:32 AM Reply With Quote
The brass "tap inserts" where they go into the chrome body are always a normal RH thread, LH threads are only on the inside to lift the washers,

Heat/freeze spray alternately might help, but I virtually guarantee that vibration using an sds drill with chisel will shift them. Just wrap rags around any chrome or anything else in the local vicinity to avoid damage

Back in the day when I was running a garage the air chisel used to get a LOT of use for moving stubborn nuts/bolts etc.!

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rgrs

posted on 7/2/24 at 02:08 PM Reply With Quote
Try a deep socket on an impact driver, normally gets them to budge without risking breaking the tap.





555

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David Jenkins

posted on 8/2/24 at 11:50 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy
Hand SWMBO the spanner tell her to fix it herself.


I was tempted...

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David Jenkins

posted on 8/2/24 at 11:52 AM Reply With Quote
Thanks for the ideas...
...I refuse to pay 10's of for a new tap unit, when all it needs is 50p for a couple of rubber washers, plus 30 minutes effort in normal situations!

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nick205

posted on 14/2/24 at 10:21 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David Jenkins
Thanks for the ideas...
...I refuse to pay 10's of for a new tap unit, when all it needs is 50p for a couple of rubber washers, plus 30 minutes effort in normal situations!



Spot on David - don't replace for when you can fix

(planet could do with a lot more of this IMHO)

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