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Author: Subject: Valuable lessons, and simple tips
gremlin1234

posted on 10/3/24 at 06:33 PM Reply With Quote
Valuable lessons, and simple tips

we all know it is a bad idea to use bricks or breese blocks to hold the car up, and then work under it... - they can easily fall or even crumble -
but just as important, don't do work near machinery wearing a tie. and equally any clothing with loose bits, like pull cords on jumpers and hoodies.

do you have any simple tips to keep us safe from ourselves?


[Edited on 10/3/24 by gremlin1234]

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gremlin1234

posted on 10/3/24 at 06:46 PM Reply With Quote
having just posted this, it reminds me that lighting in a machine shop (actually any area with revolving equipment) really should use DC lighting to remove any strobe effect.
the part can look to be moving quite slowly or even still (it can even appear to revolve backwards! ) when rotating at high speed.

[Edited on 10/3/24 by gremlin1234]

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coyoteboy

posted on 10/3/24 at 08:11 PM Reply With Quote
I once worked for a very large engineering firm, international. They had lathes that turned bar 8inches in diam and 4m long. One day a worker got his boiler suit sleeve caught in a nice slow rotating shaft but didn't have time to reach the emergency stop. Took a colleague a few seconds to reach it by which time he was somewhat less of a complete human. So very good advice.

[Edited on 10/3/2024 by coyoteboy]

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Slimy38

posted on 10/3/24 at 09:10 PM Reply With Quote
The one habit I've gotten into is when I'm done with a day of angry grinding and/or welding, I'll go back into my garage five minutes later with the lights off. If I see anything still glowing, then I need to do something about it.

Thinking about it, five minutes seem like an awfully long time for something to smoulder!!

Oh, nearly forgot a very important one. Print off a copy of the IVA, or have an electronic copy very close to hand. Also MSA blue book if you want to pick up any motorsport (or just to go that extra level above the IVA)

[Edited on 10/3/24 by Slimy38]

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J666AYP

posted on 10/3/24 at 10:14 PM Reply With Quote
Don't put your hands anywhere you wouldn't put your di.....

The best bit of workshop advice I've ever been given.

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perksy

posted on 10/3/24 at 10:40 PM Reply With Quote
Be very careful using wire wheels and discs, especially in angle grinders

Just had a long strand of wire removed that was embedded in my thigh and stitched up afterwards

Couldn't beleive how long it was when the surgeon pulled it out, It had gone black and rusty in my thigh and I'd not recommend it...

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nick205

posted on 11/3/24 at 08:00 AM Reply With Quote
gremlin1234 - good point with ties or things around the neck!

I help my local Scout group. The Scouts wear Neckers (see image).

Whenever doing ANYTHING with moving parts or open flame long hair ted back and Neckers removed.

scout-necker
scout-necker

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coyoteboy

posted on 11/3/24 at 10:02 AM Reply With Quote
I forgot neckerchiefs were a thing!
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Mr Whippy

posted on 11/3/24 at 01:11 PM Reply With Quote
1) Switch everything electrical off when you leave.

2) Have a big ass fire extinguisher handy or two.

3) If working alone, have someone check on you every couple of hours min.

4) Keep a cheapo mobile in your pocket to call for help if you get stuck or injured. I got an old flip front free off friends and have 10 top up on it in my top pocket.

5) Wear proper to cap boots and coveralls (fire proof), I use offshore ones (gifted to me )

6) Never ever go under a car unless there's at least two stands holding (wooden blocks on top) and put them under the subframe. I usually have 3 stands, a jack and the spare before I'll venture underneath. I always remember that idiot jacking his car up on the plastic sill and crushing his door such a typical YT how to vid... Twat jacking

That's some but there's tons of hazards tbh





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MikeR

posted on 11/3/24 at 11:47 PM Reply With Quote
I have an Alexa in the garage. Means my family can "announce" things to me like "dinner in 5 minutes". I can also listen to the radio, ask idiot questions and finally announce "help" or more frequently "youngest child to the garage, I need you to pump the brake pedal". It's also used to set a timer for a few minutes, alarm or reminder.

I've also got one with the time displayed so I also have a visible clock

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Mr Whippy

posted on 12/3/24 at 07:24 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MikeR
I have an Alexa in the garage. Means my family can "announce" things to me like "dinner in 5 minutes". I can also listen to the radio, ask idiot questions and finally announce "help" or more frequently "youngest child to the garage, I need you to pump the brake pedal". It's also used to set a timer for a few minutes, alarm or reminder.

I've also got one with the time displayed so I also have a visible clock


Great idea.





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Simon

posted on 12/3/24 at 09:26 PM Reply With Quote
A few years back me and neighbour had a very redneck moment

I was trying to get the Essex V6 in my Scimitar going but the wiring from key didn't exist.

So, I was jumping the terminals on the starter, neighbour was tipping petrol into carb.

The engine fired, spat back out the carb, set light to the cap of petrol in neighbour's hand, neighbour reflexively through it away.

Flaming cap of fuel landed on petrol can, lid off and set light to that.

We laughed after we stopped panicking

Another time, same neighbour disturbed me when I was cutting through rad hose with scalpel - I lost concentration and stabbed myself in hand with said scalpel. Tried sucking the blood but way too much coming out - all up garage wall, Scimitar etc etc. Few stitches and half a kitchen roll...

Laughed again

[Edited on 12/3/24 by Simon]

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Mr Whippy

posted on 12/3/24 at 10:22 PM Reply With Quote
About 20 years ago, I was under my JBA Falcon replacing the rear gearbox mounting when the engine and gearbox slipped back against my middle finger, it wasn't particularly sore as it hit the joint but it prevented me from removing my hand, now stuck under the car with everything out of reach I ended up laying on the concrete for hours and hours shouting for help. Fortunately my neighbour just happened to come home and heard me, then helped lift away the engine. I just remember how incredibly cold I got, it was not fun.

Alexa, regular checks on you, phone in pocket...





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David Jenkins

posted on 13/3/24 at 08:39 AM Reply With Quote
I usually wear my leather welding apron and welding gloves when using a wire wheel in my angry grinder... I've had random stabs from wire wheels in the past!

quote:
Originally posted by perksy
Be very careful using wire wheels and discs, especially in angle grinders

Just had a long strand of wire removed that was embedded in my thigh and stitched up afterwards

Couldn't beleive how long it was when the surgeon pulled it out, It had gone black and rusty in my thigh and I'd not recommend it...

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Mr Whippy

posted on 13/3/24 at 11:02 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David Jenkins
I usually wear my leather welding apron and welding gloves when using a wire wheel in my angry grinder... I've had random stabs from wire wheels in the past!

quote:
Originally posted by perksy
Be very careful using wire wheels and discs, especially in angle grinders

Just had a long strand of wire removed that was embedded in my thigh and stitched up afterwards

Couldn't beleive how long it was when the surgeon pulled it out, It had gone black and rusty in my thigh and I'd not recommend it...



Although apparently very obvious, always stand to the side of the grinding disk and use the side that causes the sparks to go away from you. I once lent my neighbor my grinder and was stunned and somewhat amused to watch him blast the sparks right into his face ehem is that not a bit hot?!

[Edited on 13/3/24 by Mr Whippy]





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Slimy38

posted on 13/3/24 at 11:28 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy

Although apparently very obvious, always stand to the side of the grinding disk and use the side that causes the sparks to go away from you. I once lent my neighbor my grinder and was stunned and somewhat amused to watch him blast the sparks right into his face ehem is that not somewhat hot?!


Oddly enough I struggle with this, and I think it's because I'm left handed. Keeping a good grip on the angry grinder with my dominant hand means that I get a stomach coated in shrapnel. Trying to hold it any other way either feels uncomfortable, unsafe, or I lose visibility of the workpiece. On more than one occasion I've stopped grinding and realised there are wisps of smoke coming off my clothing.

But I make it a point never to use my wire wheel. I bought it as it seemed like a good idea, but after a few uses I decided it's more trouble than it's worth. I ought to throw it away just so I'm not tempted, even picking up the damn thing leaves me with holes in my hands!!

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Mr Whippy

posted on 13/3/24 at 11:43 AM Reply With Quote
Being right handed i don't have that issue but perhaps swapping the wires round on the motor would help by getting the grinder to spin backwards? an easier swap would just be the plug connections. I think that still works on most simple AC motors. It would obviously mean flapper disks would not work well if at all, but at least have the sparks going away from you.





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SteveWalker

posted on 13/3/24 at 12:02 PM Reply With Quote
My 4-/12 inch angle grinder is fine, but when I have borrowed my father's 9 inch version (mainly for cutting brick or stone), I have struggled with it, as it is the other way around (suitable for a left-hander). He has no problems with it, as he was naturally left-handed, but forced to write right-handed in school and so has ended up truly ambidextrous.
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David Jenkins

posted on 13/3/24 at 02:11 PM Reply With Quote
I have an old fleece that I use in the garage - it has a very melted bit just at the base of the zip, due to angry grinder sparks! Didn't realise at first, until I could smell melted fleece...
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Slimy38

posted on 13/3/24 at 02:30 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David Jenkins
I have an old fleece that I use in the garage - it has a very melted bit just at the base of the zip, due to angry grinder sparks! Didn't realise at first, until I could smell melted fleece...


Yep, recycled old plastic bags disguised as warm clothing really do melt well!!

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David Jenkins

posted on 14/3/24 at 03:51 PM Reply With Quote
Another useful tip: recently welded steel parts retain their heat far longer that you'd expect!

I've never managed to give myself a severe burn by picking up a piece too soon without gloves, but quite a few items have been rapidly dropped when I realised how hot they were!

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MikeR

posted on 18/3/24 at 12:46 PM Reply With Quote
Now we're talking about setting fire to ourselves.....

Denim when new is naturally flame resistant (it's hard to set on fire) - when it's worn and tufty it's not, especially if covered in oil.

Warm clothing, especially padded or fleece jackets, tends to burn, friends spent a while when I got to the pub asking if I'd set myself on fire grinding /cutting something with the angry grinder this week.

When using the angry grinder always have a leather apron, having your crotch on fire gives an interesting dilemma, hit yourself in the testicles or burn. The leather stops the dilemma.

Always wear thick gloves, you never know when you'll need to hit yourself in the testicles to put out a fire. Burnt hands are no joke (luckily I always wore gloves)

Leave bottles of water strategically around the garage.

Check back in the garage, smouldering discarded string can smoulder for a long time.

Tidy up so your don't have discarded string or paper lying around.

Neighbours BBQs can smell like smouldering string - spent ages searching the garage for a fire that didn't exist one night

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Slimy38

posted on 18/3/24 at 02:47 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MikeR
Neighbours BBQs can smell like smouldering string - spent ages searching the garage for a fire that didn't exist one night


Our neighbour disposes of his recycling on his BBQ... I wouldn't mind if it was just paper but various coatings and other stuff on the paper makes it smell very much like rubber melting on metal or other similar garage-related smells.

I do need to get a leather apron though, then again I'm nearly at the end of the build so it's more rivets than weld now!

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Mr Whippy

posted on 18/3/24 at 02:56 PM Reply With Quote
oh yeah I have several fleeces with holes burnt right through them from the grinder, the only good thing is they don't seem to go on fire from that. Grinders are bad for fabric in general and I've set fire to boiler suits with them, the best strategy is make sure the sparks are going away from you!

Or take up knitting, that's much safer.





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gremlin1234

posted on 18/3/24 at 03:08 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Whippy

Or take up knitting, that's much safer.

it may be safer, but does have its own hazzards...
RSI, Back Pain, and it can be an addiction...
https://www.themercerie.co.uk/crochet-addiction-and-other-extreme-sports/

edit: sp

[Edited on 18/3/24 by gremlin1234]

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