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Author: Subject: How many years
jacko

posted on 4/5/24 at 06:43 PM Reply With Quote
How many years

Is a ev car good for at say 10,000 miles a year will it make 10 years thatís about as long I keep my cars
Graham





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David Jenkins

posted on 4/5/24 at 07:47 PM Reply With Quote
I do around 10k per year in mine, and it is just approaching its 5th birthday. Battery state of health is still 100% and came with a 7-year/100K miles Kia guarantee.

Don't forget that engine wear is hardly an issue, unless there's a design or manufacturing issue - if it's good at the start and isn't abused, it'll last for 100k+ miles. In my Niro the gearbox is a sealed unit, and there's no scheduled oil change - ever (it's a single ratio reduction box). Every few major services I have to pay for a battery/motor coolant change.

The rest of the car is pretty standard technology as far as suspension, tyres, lighting etc. goes.

As a sideline, somewhere in Scotland (Dundee?) the taxi drivers have chosen to use EVs and those are lasting huge mileages. Even the brake pads are lasting about 100k miles due to regenerative braking.

Update: It was Dundee

[Edited on 4/5/24 by David Jenkins]

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jacko

posted on 5/5/24 at 01:06 PM Reply With Quote
Hi this is good to know
Can I ask which Kia model you have please
G





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David Jenkins

posted on 5/5/24 at 04:26 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jacko
Hi this is good to know
Can I ask which Kia model you have please
G


Kia Niro EV.

I must say that the latest MG EVs are also impressive - quite a bit cheaper, got a good reputation, quite popular, and also have the 7-year warranty. I have no real experience with owning or driving one though.

[Edited on 5/5/24 by David Jenkins]

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jacko

posted on 5/5/24 at 05:59 PM Reply With Quote
Thank you David
Graham





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craig1410

posted on 5/5/24 at 11:35 PM Reply With Quote
Currently sitting at 83340 miles on our BMW i3 which we bought new in January 2017. So that's 83340 in 7 years and 4 months which comes out as around 950 miles a month or 11400 miles a year.

The battery and powertrain are still under the original 8 year warranty and honestly we've not see any significant degradation in the battery capacity in all these years. We have no plans to replace the car even when the 8 year warranty expires as we see no reason to do so.

I can honestly see us still driving this car in another 7 years time and if we need to buy a new motor or battery then we'll probably do just that. Running costs are so low that we can afford to pay for occasional failures and still come out ahead compared to a conventional ICE car.

HTH

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jacko

posted on 6/5/24 at 10:37 AM Reply With Quote
Thank you thatís nice to hear and says a lot for ev cars
Graham





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David Jenkins

posted on 6/5/24 at 11:02 AM Reply With Quote
As an aside - I had to go and buy a can of petrol for our lawnmower the other day, and I was really put off by the stink of petrol & diesel around the petrol station. I had forgotten just how smelly oil products are, as this is now the only reason why we buy any of the stuff, 2 or 3 times a year! I could smell the stuff on the bottom of my shoes on the drive home as well <bleugh>.
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jacko

posted on 6/5/24 at 03:03 PM Reply With Quote
Haha Iím on the right track then I have an electric grass cutter. &#128526;





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bi22le

posted on 7/5/24 at 11:16 AM Reply With Quote
We have had a few lease EVs. I think if you buy new now, not a 5 year old low millage EV, you should be good for what you want.

Obviously do your research. Kia Nero EV has cracking reviews, the Kia EV6 has loads of issues.





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craig1410

posted on 7/5/24 at 08:52 PM Reply With Quote
Just watched this video and it seems to answer your question and mirrors my own experience with our i3. In fact this car is almost identical to ours. Of particular note is the battery capacity where they showed in the video that the capacity remaining after 100k miles is still greater than the capacity guaranteed by BMW when brand new!

I have to say, the lack of degradation doesn't surprise me all that much because I have Pylontech home energy storage batteries which are rated at 8000 cycles down to a depth of discharge of 95%. That means I can go from 100% to 5% and back to 100% up to 8000 times, and the manufacturer will replace the battery if its capacity drops below something like 80% during that time. In fact, when I bought the batteries the guaranteed cycle count was 6000 cycles but they increased this retrospectively after receiving much better data from the field than expected.

When you consider how many battery cycles 100,000 miles represents, it's just a bit more than 800 (100000/120 = 833) so even with older battery technology and in a harsher environment, it is still very believable that we'll see minimal degradation over that period. What is perhaps more likely to happen is just for heat and cold and vibration to take their toll and cause eventual failures but only time will tell. BMW certainly very tightly control the temperature of the battery pack but I'm not sure about other manufacturers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfQDK1SiZ38

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