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Author: Subject: winterising
sdh2903

posted on 2/12/12 at 10:49 AM Reply With Quote
winterising

Hi All

Now that winter is upon us what do you normally do with your cars? At present its just been parked for the past 6 weeks in the garage. Went out this morning to fire it up and the battery is sluggish so that's just been stuck on charge and was toying with draining the fuel.

The car has a carbed R1 engine, any suggestions with what to with the carbs? leave full of fuel? remove and drain?

I do have some winter mods planned but as most are paint related these wont be happening until late feb early march.

Cheers
Steve






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Dusty

posted on 2/12/12 at 11:06 AM Reply With Quote
Winterising.
Long johns, thermal vest, two more layers and a decent anorak, gloves, woolly hat. Drain the petrol by use of the right foot on any day that it isn't bucketing down but remember to refill with fresh petrol for the following weekend! Well that's how I do it.

[Edited on 2/12/12 by Dusty]

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sdh2903

posted on 2/12/12 at 11:11 AM Reply With Quote
But I'm a fair weather driver so what do I do?

As soon as the gritters came out the car went to bed for the winter.






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ReMan

posted on 2/12/12 at 11:36 AM Reply With Quote
I wouldn't do anything.
Even if I wasn't going to drive it.
OK antifreeze, in the unlikely event of less than -10 in your garage





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britishtrident

posted on 2/12/12 at 11:49 AM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ReMan
I wouldn't do anything.
Even if I wasn't going to drive it.
OK antifreeze, in the unlikely event of less than -10 in your garage



Renfrewshire has seen lows of almost -20c in recent winters, it was -3.5 in central Scotland at 10am this morning.





[I] What use our work, Bennet, if we cannot care for those we love? .
― From BBC TV/Amazon's Ripper Street.
[/I]

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britishtrident

posted on 2/12/12 at 12:00 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sdh2903
Hi All

Now that winter is upon us what do you normally do with your cars? At present its just been parked for the past 6 weeks in the garage. Went out this morning to fire it up and the battery is sluggish so that's just been stuck on charge and was toying with draining the fuel.

The car has a carbed R1 engine, any suggestions with what to with the carbs? leave full of fuel? remove and drain?

I do have some winter mods planned but as most are paint related these wont be happening until late feb early march.

Cheers
Steve


Put a bit extra 15 psi pressure in the tyres -- or if you feel really keen support the car on blocks to prevent the tyres flat spotting.
Leave the handbrake off to prevent the shoes/pads sticking to the drum/disc
You can put a poly bag sealed with an elastic band over the brake reservoir to reduce moisture ingress.
Any time you start the engine over the winter put it in gear and slip the clutch for a couple of seconds.
The battery will always produce less voltage in below zero temperatures so always put the battery on a freshen up charge before starting.





[I] What use our work, Bennet, if we cannot care for those we love? .
― From BBC TV/Amazon's Ripper Street.
[/I]

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wilkingj

posted on 2/12/12 at 12:07 PM Reply With Quote
Even though I have sold my beloved Viento, there are things you can do if you are not going to use it for a while.

Use a maintenance battery charger like an Optimate or similar. But definately a "maintenance" type charger.

Use a Fuel stabiliser. Fuel can go gummy as the higher order spirits evaporate off leaving the thicker and gummy deposits.
I never had a big problem with the fuel. I would leave it with a gallon maybe two in it. Then on a dry day, take it out for a 30 mile blast and put in another gallon or two, then back in the garage. ie dont let the fuel get too old, use it up when there is a nice day. Only kept enough to get to the fuel station and a decent "warm up" drive, then replaced the fuel. A whole tankful requires a longer drive when perhaps you dont want to due to the weather / temp etc etc. Little and often! It saves having to clean out the fuel system in the spring. ie dont let it get that way in the first place.


WD 40 on exposed parts athat are likely to rust / corrode (inculdes ally parts)
Having just bought a Harley Davidson (Yes I know two wheels and winter approaching!!)
I have come across a anti rust treatment that I have yet to see on the Kit car scene.
Its called ACF50. Evidently its used in the airraft industry and employs a thin film technology and anti corrosion properties.
About 12-15 a can, best place to buy Ebay assuming its not a fake .
I have got some to see how well it performs on the ally on the bike.

Cheaper way is to buy something like "Duck Oil" Made by DEB the people who make Swarfega.
I used this a lot on my Landy, and it comes in 5L tins from most Motor factors, and is not really a high st shop thing.
Fair bit cheaper than WD40. I used a cheapo garden rose sprayer to apply it with.

I also used Finnegans Waxoyl in the unseen parts of the chassis. Its excellent stuff albeit a bit messy to apply.
Old bedsheets and then newspaper on the concrete before applying!
Best done earlier in the year when its a bit warmer!
In this weather, cut with 10% white sprit, or warm the tin first.
DO NOT WARM THE TIN WITH A NAMED FLAME OR ON THE COOKER.
Be warned!!!! Be VERY AFWAID if you try that!
I put some in a parrafin gun (150psi compressor on the other end) and was warming the nozzle with a blowlamp.. Result was a flamethrower that did 6-8ft of flaming liquid that nearly set fire to the neighbours fence!! Its seriously nasty stuff if you have a fire with it. Burns like F**K

Really impressive, but VERY dangerous. Have never done it again, and learned a valuable lesson NOT to pratt about or take shortcuts with flames and waxoyl. I always use the bucket and hot water method .

Best way to warm, is a plastic bucket with the tin in it, and then add hot water, top up with a kettle to keep the temp up. Takes a bit longer, but considerably safer.


Also a small squirt of WD or Duck oil in electrical connections.
If you have a Sierra Stalks, a squirt of WD40 ir similar into the area around the hazard switch is a good idea.
Water will drip in there as its very exposed. It will then corrode the PCB, and give rise to strange faults.
Only fix is another set of switches. These are getting less abundant these days, also quite expensive.


Just my 2d's worth for the winter.








1. The point of a journey is not to arrive.
2. Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

Best Regards
Geoff
http://www.v8viento.co.uk

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Dick Axtell

posted on 2/12/12 at 03:31 PM Reply With Quote
Some very useful tips in this thread, especially from those who have had probs, and found the practical method to sort them.

Especially wilkingj!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Quote - "I put some in a parrafin gun (150psi compressor on the other end) and was warming the nozzle with a blowlamp ......................"!! Unquote.

Major lack of risk assessment. Mind you, he made it sound comical, although perhaps not for the neighbour whose fence got torched.

Have experienced irritating rain ingress problem here -

"Also a small squirt of WD or Duck oil in electrical connections.
If you have a Sierra Stalks, a squirt of WD40 ir similar into the area around the hazard switch is a good idea.
Water will drip in there as its very exposed. It will then corrode the PCB, and give rise to strange faults.
"

Thanks for this tip. Will deffo give it a try. And your warnings carefully noted.

[Edited on 2/12/12 by Dick Axtell]





Work-in-Progress: Changed to Zetec + T9. Still trying!!

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Chippy

posted on 2/12/12 at 03:36 PM Reply With Quote
Another vote for ACF50, really great stuff. My bikes live outside all year and I find a thin coat of this keeps all the chrome and alloy bits like new. Cheers Ray





To make a car go faster, just add lightness. Colin Chapman - OR - fit a bigger engine. Chippy

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Bluemoon

posted on 2/12/12 at 05:16 PM Reply With Quote
The Duck oil looks good tempted to try, but as it's silicone based I guess this might not be a good idea in that painting stuff that's been in contact with it could be a problem?
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britishtrident

posted on 2/12/12 at 05:40 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bluemoon
The Duck oil looks good tempted to try, but as it's silicone based I guess this might not be a good idea in that painting stuff that's been in contact with it could be a problem?



Duck oil is mineral oul based as with WD40 it contains no Silicone it is mainly Kerosene & Gas oil, naptha and lanolin.

Which is why it should never be used anywhere near rubber brake parts.





[I] What use our work, Bennet, if we cannot care for those we love? .
― From BBC TV/Amazon's Ripper Street.
[/I]

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ReMan

posted on 2/12/12 at 05:40 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bluemoon
The Duck oil looks good tempted to try, but as it's silicone based I guess this might not be a good idea in that painting stuff that's been in contact with it could be a problem?

afaik duck oil is not silicone?





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Bluemoon

posted on 2/12/12 at 05:56 PM Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bluemoon
The Duck oil looks good tempted to try, but as it's silicone based I guess this might not be a good idea in that painting stuff that's been in contact with it could be a problem?


Humm Looks like as above silicone free; silly interweb think I must have stumblied on a site saying it was silicone based..

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dhutch

posted on 2/12/12 at 07:53 PM Reply With Quote
I dont do a lot, keep the tyre pressures up, douse exposed metal in ATC50, roll the car 6inchs every few months to avoid flat spots, take it for a spin one or twice, putting in 5l of fresh petrol each time, roll on spring!



Daniel

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wilkingj

posted on 2/12/12 at 08:15 PM Reply With Quote
Agreed... No WD40, Duck Oil, or any other oil based stuff on any rubber or brake bits.

"Son of a Gun" is probably better for rubber and plastic parts. Again... Check before use!

I believe, (again, You need to check) that Waxoyl is OK on rubber bits.

As for the neighbours fence, I managed to control the situation fairly quickly.
It was a surprise for me as it happened so quick.
However it was outdoors, and I was aware of the fire hazard. Hence being outside!

I keep a Co2, and a Powder extinguisher handy in the garage, but didnt need it in this case.
You never know when you might need one or the other, and hopefully never both!







1. The point of a journey is not to arrive.
2. Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

Best Regards
Geoff
http://www.v8viento.co.uk

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